Occupy Charleston Spreads the Sparkle All Over Santorum: An Interview with the Glitter Bombers
24 Jan 2012

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>>>Dream Chaser Activist * Live Music Enthusiast * Cannabis Industry Expert *Sparkle Spreader * Mindfulness Teacher * Yogi Artist with a Mermaid Soul <<<

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After a disappointing third place finish in South Carolina’s Republican Primary, Occupy Charleston protesters informed presidential candidate, Rick Santorum, that his presence was unwelcome in their beloved state. I had the opportunity to discuss Rick’s glitter bombing incident with Occupy Charleston’s Chris Inglese and Adiranna Varedi to further investigate the movement and our country’s current political disposition from Occupy Charleston’s point of view.

Sparkleberry Lane (SBL): The Republican Party is facing a lot of controversy from the Occupy Protesters around the country, is there a candidate Occupy Charleston sees potential in, or does no one offer what America needs at the moment?

Occupy Charleston (OC):At the moment there are no candidates that Occupy Charleston sees potential in; all accept money from super-pacs and all have contributed to silencing the voices of American dissent, which is un-American. Ron Paul says some good things but we cannot agree with him on his strong stance on abortion, deregulating the EPA, or his radical foreign policy agenda. Occupy Charleston is a politically autonomous organization and will not endorse any candidates.

SBL: Is President Obama simply the lesser of two evils, or is he a legitimate force for change in our country?

OC: Our country is divided on this subject and it really depends on the individual’s belief. A lot of Americans believe Obama is the lesser of two evils and that he is not a legitimate force of change for our country. Those who believe in this view him as a product of the capitalist system that seeks to separate and marginalize anyone expressing views not in line with the dominant force. On the other hand some are more sympathetic with the system and recognize that one person/position can only make so much of a difference and that congress ultimately passes the laws. Leaving some faith in Obama.

SBL: Did the members of Occupy Charleston vote during the Republican Primaries in South Carolina? Why or why not?

OC: Some did, and some didn’t. In response to our discontent with the candidates, we created and distributed an issue-based ballot that allowed the voter to support issues rather than politicians.

SBL: Occupy Charleston made national news after glitter-bombing Republican Rick Santorum, third place runner up in the South Carolina Republican Primaries.  What was the message behind the sprinkle of sparkles?

OC: The Santorum glitter bomb incident was a statement from Occupy Charleston saying “You can evict us from our occupation, you can try to marginalize us; but ultimately, we will have our say. We will not let the citizens of America get manipulated by partisan tactics used to divide our country. We recognize the hypocrisy and absurdity of the Santorum campaign and wanted to undermine the legitimacy that the “liberal media” has given it.”  Santorum and other Republican candidates should stop spreading a message of hate towards LGBT.  Santorum’s position on gays in the military, gay marriage, and his comparison with gay sex to bestiality is wrong and a politician should be confronted when he declares all Americans should have equal opportunities but then insists military members who are gay should continue to live a lie or that two people who love each other should be denied the right to marry.

SBL: Did the idea for the attack of glitter come from presidential candidate Vermin Love Supreme’s video? What happened when the glitter was thrown?

OC: The idea came from the Internet and during the moments after glitter was thrown Santorum was escorted to an area in front of the myriad of local, national, and international press cameras. I (Chris) made my way to Santorum.  He was preparing to be interviewed by a national news personality.  I got right up to him, looked him in the eyes, and quietly said “Jesus loves gay people.”  His response was a sarcastic “that’s nice.”  Then I asked him, “Why don’t you love gay people?”  To which he said, “I do love gay people.”  And I said “but your message is that you hate them.”  We were actually just talking no glitter, no yelling, and no obscenities. Then before I knew it his goons started shouting “get him out of here.”  I was physically assaulted and rather shocked as I stood there civilly confronting Rick Santorum on his position regarding LGBT issues.

SBL: At sparkleberrylane.com our tag line is “Spread the Sparkle,” and we want everyone to know how good it feels to do so.  So we ask you, how did it feel to spread the sparkle all over Santorum?

OC: It felt really great to stand up for human rights and equality and we were empowered at that moment.

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SBL: What do the Occupiers of Charleston think of Newt Gingrich’s South Carolina Victory?

OC: It is interesting and unfortunate. Newt takes bigotry and hate and makes it sound smart and sexy.  It’s a trick and we find it difficult to believe that the 36% of African Americans in South Carolina find him appealing. No one can be happy with Newt’s victory; however, what we can be happy about is the utter chaos that is rocking the Republican Party.

SBL: Who would Occupy Charleston like to see in charge of the country?

OC: Occupy Charleston is politically autonomous and will not endorse a candidate.  Many of us feel that until we clean up the system by getting corporate money out of politics, there is no legitimate process to engage.  Whoever becomes President will continue to represent the interests of the wealthiest in this country and disregard regular working class Americans.  If it were possible, the most ideal leader would be one of the intelligently truehearted occupiers involved in this movement.

SBL: The Occupy movement has been evolving ever since its first appearance at Zuccotti Park on 9/17/2011.  Where do you think the movement stands today?

OC: The movement stands as a presence for truth and justice.  It stands for the insistence that we clean up our government and separate the powers of the people from the powers of money. This movement is international and it is a development centered around regaining rights that have been taken from all of us by the hegemony. There are 1800 cells worldwide.

SBL: How can supporters of the movement for government reform, who do not have the time or energy to participate in Occupy protests, general assemblies, or sit-ins, still make impacts in line with the movement?

OC: Support is not only physical. You can get on the web and tell us what you want to see changed in this country.  But It will take all of us, whenever possible, to be active to really make a difference.  It would be nice if you can sit at home and write a letter to your congressperson.  But what this movement really requires is action.  Participation in the political process and in City Council meetings are things we take for granted in this country.  However, billions of people around the world will never have an opportunity to impact their government.  We need numbers and we need to show elected people that we are here and we are paying attention. We know it is hard sometimes.  But it really matters that you participate anytime you can. Show up and have your voice be heard.

SBL: Our readers appreciate conscious living and value enjoyment of life through awareness.  Is there any other message you would like to share with them?

OC: There is a place for you in occupy.

Don’t forget to like Occupy Charleston Here!

Donate to the members of Occupy Charleston Here!

Learn more about Occupy!

 

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